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Category: Recipes & Cooking

Preparing dried legumes

Although legumes (e.g. beans, peas or lentils in all their varieties, forms and shapes) are available ready-to-use and cheap in any given supermarket, many people don’t know how to prepare them from their dried state. Yet, for an old freaky prepper like me 🙂 they are very useful: Their shelf life is a felt eternity, they’re nutritious and, well, occasionally they taste really good.


Brussels Sprouts with Chestnuts and Bacon

I  gave one of the Bacon sides from recently to a close friend of mine and he made this from some of it! Looks yummy, eh? 😀

He took the recipe from here (english translation below), but he recommends to leave out the butter for more crispiness. I’m glad he liked it!


Cooking Rice without a Rice Cooker

I don’t know anymore where this is from. I Did it once and it worked absolutely well. Nonetheless, I have a rice cooker now 😀


Notes on Flour

Stolen from here

(Updated) Stolen from here

Hey! In reaction to my recent post on yeast I’ve been asked “what about flour”? Well, I’m not a baker, I’m not into cake, cookies and pastry – just baking bread from time to time.

So here’s my (very condensed and one-sided) information on flour types that I have learned over the last couple of years, with special focus on the differences / translations between american and german. Good sources for more information are cheatsheet.com and weekendbakery.com.

(Concerning that Image: I’ve actually never heard of “Flour Type 812” here in Germany…)

 

 


Common Slow Cooker Fuck Ups

Ahhh… tonight’s Dinner will be some hearty stew from the Crockpot! To me, my slow cooker is a hassle-free, easy and convenient way to prepare food. It’s really hard to completely ruin a slow cooker meal, it’ll most probably come out at least edible.

However, it’s not completely idiot-proof, so here’s a comprehensive but most certainly uncomplete list of “slow-cooker-don’ts” for information. Some of them are widely available on the internet (for example here) and some of them I’ve experienced by myself, purely and completely on my own 🙂


January Bacon is done

The new batch of home-cured bacon is finally done. Took them out of the smoker yesterday in the evening after two 2.5-hour-runs of smoking with the small burner.


Notes on Baker’s Yeast

I like baking my own bread from time to time. Recently, I came across some useful information on baker’s yeast that I want to share here:

As you all know, there are two types of yeast being sold in supermarkets – fresh yeast and dry yeast. They’re to be handled a little different each since they come in different forms, but they’re both the same organism (“Saccharomyces cerevisiae” – which derives from its origin from brewing beer). They also both do the same thing: They give your dough fluffiness, airiness and volume by natural fermentation.

Fresh Yeast comes in the form of little cubes, always weighing 42g
Dry Yeast comes as a powdery substance in little packages, always weighing 7g


Home Made Pork Rinds

I also bought skin-on pork belly for bacon curing this time and made pork rinds from the cut-offs. Nothing simpler than that: Heat your oven on “broil” to about 250 – 280 °C. Put your pork skin pieces onto a rack and salt them “as you would salt a roast” (statement of the sales lady at the butcher shop). Leave in the oven for about 15 minutes, turn over and grill for another 10 – 15 minutes more – until they’re crisp and blistered. Delicious.


New Batch of Bacon

A new batch of (hopefully) delicious, yummy and scrumptious bacon is on it’s way! They’re four pieces of about 750 g each, salted with my standard meat curing formula and vacuumed tightly. They’re now resting in the fridge to cure for about eight days. My mouth is already watering…


Homemade Bread Dumplings

The cristmas eve edition of homemade bread dumplings as made by my sister-in-law. It’s an absolutely traditional southern german / austrian dish and it’s my first time to make them myself and not use the store-bought ones. Well, the pre-made dumplings will have a hard time from now on.


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