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Tag: Plans & Info

Rebar Wire Twister Tool

I want to attach some wooden reinforcements to the raised bed’s paling fence in the northern germany refuge. While refraining from using simple zip ties, I will try rebar wire. Here’s the tool I want to to do it with: A simple attachment for the cordless drill, easy to make and for zero costs.


Indoor Grill

I’ve been pondering on a hibachi-style, japanese or chinese inspired indoor grill for over a year now. I want it to work with charcoal (I’m a purist and I don’t like electric grills) and be able to grill yakitori, smaller pieces of meat (yakiniku) or accomodate a clay pot.


Fassl Tripod (Western Style)

We’re planning to arrange a party for the immediate neighbourhood in the northern germany refuge because they’ve all been great people to us and we want to give something back. If this works out, I want to make a big pot of chili over the open fire for everyone. Best done in a big dutch oven over the “Fassl“, so here’s the tripod that I made for this occasion:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A Small and Simple Router Table

When you have small parts that need routing (trimming edges, making groves, etc.), it is easier to have the router fixed and move the workpiece rather than doing it the other way round. So a small and easily detachable router table is a decent solution, but:


Drying Sage

We cut down about 1/3 of our sage bush in the northern germany garden because it was beginning to overgrow nearly everything else in the spot.

Instead of throwing it away, we decided to dry it for later and I was the lucky one that had to pluck the leaves off the stems. I felt like my grandma, sitting on her porch when I was a child, cleaning several kilos of green beans for canning 🙂 . Anyway, your fingers smell utterly divine after that job!

We then simply dried the leaves in the oven, laid out evenly on 3 trays: Hot air, at 50°C for about 6 hours. With a wooden spoon stuck in the oven door to keep a small slit open to let the air escape.


Tutorial: Knife Care with a Sharpening System

I had a friend of mine over these days with two well-used and now dull knives – this inspired me to write this article. At a certain point of knife usage, just honing a blade’s edge won’t do the job anymore and you will have to re-sharpen your knife and give it a nice clean edge again.

This is how I do this with all my knives, kitchen or outdoor, in this case using a Lansky knife-sharpening-system (which I know is discussed controversially on the internet). With a little training and devotion you can achieve excellent results with it – and in a much easier way than with a traditional whetstone. This is my way to do it and it works absolutely satisfying for me.


Box Bellows

I was fascinated by a japanese blacksmith’s video where this guy was working with a (seemingly) traditional two-stroke box bellows, and as things worked out, my hairdryer that I used as a blower for my coal forge recently threw in the towel. So the mission was clear, I wanted to make such a cool box-bellows-contraption myself. After doing some internet research, here’s what I did and what I used:


DIY Bucksaw

I got a very good saw blade for christmas that I finally wanted to put to use. As boyscouts, we had simple bucksaws when out on camp so I decided to reproduce one the like.


Raised Garden Beds

It took me some time to make these two garden beds, interruptions and delays included, but now they’re done and ready to grow some greens.


Propagating Mushrooms

So I will try to propagate some of the mycelium from the oyster mushroom growing kit. I have already done this years ago and it worked fairly well, so I hope these will thrive as well.

The materials for the growing substrate are 500g of rye grains, 25g of gypsum and 500ml of water. Cook this over medium heat, stirring often, until no more liquid is left over in the pan. You want the grains to be evenly covered in gypsum and well soaked but reasonably dry on the surface.


 

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