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Category: Knife making

Even more Micarta

I made another plate of homegrown micarta. This time in red – afaik, the fabric was a window curtain in its former life. Since it says „back to the grindstone“ for me these days, I wonder when I might be able to put it to use 🙁


Making Micarta – Test II

 

So after another test fabricating micarta I grabbed the first one again and lo and behold: After 48 hrs more curing time it has become hard and durable! Mental note: The thicker the material the more time needed to cure (who would have thought?) and the specification on the package was just plain wrong.


Making Micarta – Test I

I’m trying to make my own Micarta at the moment because I want to use it for a new knife project. I made a simple press, took an old t-shirt and some epoxy and started.


New Bevel Grinding Jig

Without further a do, my bevel grinding jig for knife making just … disappeared … (somehow, things in my shop seem to have a tendency for that when I’m around…). So I made a new one, this time from aluminium, since it’s simply easier to work on for me.


Blacksmithing Course, Part II

So, today I took my second part of the blacksmithing course at Schmiede Bötersheim. Again it was absolutely great, but:

I could kick myself in the a** so much…

I didn’t pay enough attention for a moment and let a thin part of the poker I’m working on get too cold while hammering it, which made it brittle and weak at that point. Grinning knowingly as well as indulgently, the blacksmith stated that’s a really common beginner’s fuckup and she welded it safe in seconds 🙂

At least I’m learning and (hopefully) I’m improving.


Blacksmithing Course, Part I

I was gifted a beginner’s blacksmithing course for christmas way back in 2019 by my (deeply beloved 🙂 ) wife. Unfortunately, due to Corona it couldn’t take place for almost two years, but now I was finally able to take part.

IT WAS FRIGGIN’ AWESOME!

I recommend everyone (even if only slightly) interested in blacksmithing take such a course. It’s an eye-opener, it’s loads of fun and it gives a great feeling of achievement. Ahhh… and yes, of course, you also LEARN exponentially along the way. I’m so hooked right now.


Knife Tang Hole Filer

I made a tang hole filer for my next knife project to come. Just drilling and working with a needle file is not very satisfactory. I used a jigsaw blade that I trimmed down a little, some scrap wood and a dab of epoxy glue. Done.


Fierce Pizza Axe, Part I

I stumbled upon an image of a pizza cutter someone made, namely in the form a small axe. Cool idea! So here’s the beginning of my version – viking style:


Tutorial: Knife Care with a Sharpening System

I had a friend of mine over these days with two well-used and now dull knives – this inspired me to write this article. At a certain point of knife usage, just honing a blade’s edge won’t do the job anymore and you will have to re-sharpen your knife and give it a nice clean edge again.

This is how I do this with all my knives, kitchen or outdoor, in this case using a Lansky knife-sharpening-system (which I know is discussed controversially on the internet). With a little training and devotion you can achieve excellent results with it – and in a much easier way than with a traditional whetstone. This is my way to do it and it works absolutely satisfying for me.


Box Bellows

I was fascinated by a japanese blacksmith’s video where this guy was working with a (seemingly) traditional two-stroke box bellows, and as things worked out, my hairdryer that I used as a blower for my coal forge recently threw in the towel. So the mission was clear, I wanted to make such a cool box-bellows-contraption myself. After doing some internet research, here’s what I did and what I used:


 

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