• sl68
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl64
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl46
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl39
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl6
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl50
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl49
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl18
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl42
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl24
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl56
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl60
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl53
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl91
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl90
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl19
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl25
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl26
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl32
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl34
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl41
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl44
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl51
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl55
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl59
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl78
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl75
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl66
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl87
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl86
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl83
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl81
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl80
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl63
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl61
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl72
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl71
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl70
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl69
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl67
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl65
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl48
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl58
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl57
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl54
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl52
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl47
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl45
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl43
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl38
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl37
  • sl36
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl35
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl33
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl31
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl30
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl29
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl28
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl27
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl23
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl22
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl21
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl20
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl17
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl16
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl15
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl14
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl13
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl12
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl11
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl10
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl9
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl8
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl5
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl4
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl3
    Just another DIY Blog . . .
  • sl1
    Just another DIY Blog . . .

Tag: Sticky

AC/DC Symbolism

Got myself a (fairly simple) multimeter for the northern germany refuge lately.

I wonder if I will eventually arrive at a point in my life when I’ve memorized these two simple symbols without having to look them up. Every. Single. Time. 🙂

Edit: Here’s a good explanation on how multimeters work (german language – sorry).


My standard meat curing formula

Edit: Now with an image, because I made some bacon today 🙂

So here’s my standard recipe for curing meat that I mostly use. It can be adjusted to personal needs in terms of herbs and spices, but I strongly recommend to stick to the directions concerning the curing salt.

Recipe (per kg of meat):
30-40 g curing salt (NOT pink salt, see below)
10 g brown sugar
1 tsp. freshly and coarsely ground black pepper
1 tsp. dried rosemary


How To: Make a Roux

Roux - Stolen Image (allrecipes.com)

Roux – Stolen Image (allrecipes.com)

I was asked by a member of the extended family circle about a recipe requiring a roux.

So let’s make a “Roux“… Ahh… yeah, right. Sure. Of course. This is french. It’s pronounced ( /ˈr/ ) and this sounds sooo much better than the german Mehlschwitze, which – honestly – sounds more like a sore throat 🙂 .

A roux is used as a basis for things like heavy sauces, soups or stews. It thickens them up and makes them creamy and rich. Since it’s a base-ingredient, it is very versatile and can be used for a wide variety of cooking tasks from the standard french cuisine mother sauce Béchamel up to New Orleans Gumbo. Google “roux usage” and you’ll see what I mean.

Some people find making a roux a little intimidating because, yes, you can absolutely screw it up, but if you follow these simple steps here, I promise you’ll nail it every time. It’s no magic.


Pasta Cooking for Dummies

These are my 5 commandments for cooking italian pasta that I’ve gathered over the last years and that have proven useful. It’s not that hard anyway but not everyone is a routined chef and I would have been happy if I had known some of these seemingly plain tips in the beginning.

These basic steps and fundamentals will hopefully help you nail it as much as they helped me 🙂

If you’re still pondering with pasta to cook, have a look at Jamie Oliver’s pasta shapes guide.


Homemade Hand Sanitizer

In times of the Corona-Virus outbreaks all over the world, everybody is recommended to pay close attention to hand hygiene. Up to now, hand disinfectant solutions are still available without any problems here where I live, but I thought it wouldn’t be a bad idea to pick up how to make some on my own in case of a shortage. Doing some research, I stumbled upon the WHO’s official formulation, which you can also download here. There are two versions published, but I’ll concentrate on one of them exemplary. Here’s the recipe:

 


Finding a LED’s Polarity

LED PolarityI needed this for a project that I’m working on at the moment (I can never remember it correctly…) I thought perhaps someone might find it useful.

More about LEDs on Wikipedia.


Prepping: My “EDC Kit”

Thinking about various occasions where an “emergency kit” might come in handy lately, here’s also my list of things that I carry around with me by default – I don’t even notice it in my pocket anymore. Nobody needs any more than that if he’s not in, like, Canada’s wilderness 🙂


Prepping: My Car “Get Home Kit”

There was a veritable winter storm with much media coverage sweeping over germany the last days. I got stuck in traffic (harmless), the weather got worse and worse and I had some free time to wonder about what I’d do when there’s a real SHTF situation of that kind. Here’s what I came up with for a wintery, cold and unpleasant car-sticky-situation:


Tips on Cold Smoking

I plan on smoking some meat again shortly, so I find it’s a good idea to gather and sum up my experiences on cold smoking a little. I will not describe the actual processes and mechanisms of smoking foods here, but if you’re interested, read on on wikipedia. It’s worth the time.

There are three types of smoking:

Hot smoking (60 – 110 °C / 140 – 230 °F):
This is what you do in a BBQ smoker. More delicious cooking than actual smoking.

Warm smoking (25 – 60 °C / 77 – 140 °F):
The intermediate thing. Some Proteins begin to denaturate at these temperatures.

Cold smoking (10 – 25 °C / 50 – 77 °F):
The “original” way of smoking, used for centuries to conserve goods. The only method discussed here.


Cool Knot

Stumbled upon this cool, easy to release knot on the internet. Does anybody know it’s name?


 

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close