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Tag: Meat Recipes

My standard meat curing formula

Edit: Now with an image, because I made some bacon today 馃檪

So here’s my standard recipe for curing meat that I mostly use. It can be adjusted to personal needs in terms of herbs and spices, but I strongly recommend to stick to the directions concerning the curing salt.

Recipe (per kg of meat):

30 – 40 g curing salt, which equals 3 – 4% by weight (and not “pink salt” etc., see below)
10 g brown sugar
1 tsp. freshly and coarsely ground black pepper
1 tsp. dried rosemary


Pig’s Trotters and Tails

I’ve got an eMail Request from far abroad, that’s great! Someone from the U.S. wanted to know how we made the pig’s trotters and tails several years ago, so here’s the recipe. Thanks Alan for your request!


Slow Braised Beef Short Ribs with Red Wine Sauce

Slow braised short ribs – a delight to me. Although a very cheap cut they come out delicious when done with a little attention, time and some patience.

There’s no magic to it – on the contrary, you’ll have about half an hour of work and will then be able to laze around for 2 1/2 hours! Here’s my recipe:


Home Made Pork Rinds

I also bought skin-on pork belly for bacon curing this time and made pork rinds from the cut-offs. Nothing simpler than that: Heat your oven on “broil” to about 250 – 280 掳C. Put your pork skin pieces onto a rack and salt them “as you would salt a roast” (statement of the sales lady at the butcher shop). Leave in the oven for about 15 minutes, turn over and grill for another 10 – 15 minutes more – until they’re crisp and blistered. Delicious.


Biggest Batch of Sausages so far

Yesterday I made the biggest batch of “Bratwurscht” ever since I’m doing this. It took me a whole afternoon, to grind meat, season, knead and fill into casings. Now I’ve got 2 types of sausages, ending up with 4,5 kg in total:


Six Hours Rib Smoking Session

I tried smoking pork short ribs using the “professional” 3-2-1 Hours Method yesterday and they really came out outstandingly great! So what does that mean? It means you have three stages of cooking:


Sous Vide Duck Breast

Yesterday鈥檚 Dinner for two. I should really work on the presentation, but – man! – this was delicious! The sous vide gadget makes sure the duck breast comes out perfectly, pink in the middle and absolutely not overcooked. I really like that thing!

The fat side was seared in the pan and glazed with a mix of sherry and honey. The sauce was a reduction of red wine, balsamic vinegar, garlic and honey. This was serious work, but it was absolutely worth the effort.


New Load of Cured Meat

I made a new batch of meat for curing and smoking. This time I will make two sorts: My standard cured pork (right side) like I already did several times. They’re about 700g each, so I’m planning to smoke one of them after curing and dry the other one.

The other type is “Bresaola” – cured and dried beef. It’s been cured with red wine for 24 hours and is now being cured with salt, sugar and herbs in the fridge. After that It’s going to be dried.


 

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